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How to Get Dye Stains Out of Carpet

Dye stain? No worries. Dyes can be removed from carpet.

Dyes are found in many foods, drinks, and other items, such as magic markers, health and beauty products, cleaning solutions, and decorative items. When dyes end up on your carpet or upholstery, they can be difficult to remove if improper methods are employed. Here are our PRO tips for getting dye stains out.

Blot. Blot. Blot. Then Blot Even More.

Use a white cloth or paper towels to blot as much of the dye as you can. Follow this with putting a few drops of cold water directly onto the dye stain. The water will help dilute remaining dye. Continue with blotting, using a clean section of the cloth or towel each time. Do not rub! Just blot, drip a little water, and blot some more, over and over until no more of the stain is transferring to the cloth or towel.

IMPORTANT!

Don’t forget to test: Of course, your stains don’t always cooperate by appearing in inconspicuous areas, but do keep in mind that it is always recommended that you first test any cleaning solution on a portion of carpet or upholstery that is out of the way, such as a closet or the under side of furniture. Do not use these methods on wool, leather, or silk carpeting or rugs.

The following methods are great for dyes and a host of other tough stains. You will likely need to repeat the process several times to completely remove the dye. Stain removal takes patience and persistence.

The Dish Soap and White Wine Vinegar Solution Method

  1. Pour two cups of warm water into a bowl. Stir in a tablespoon of white vinegar and another tablespoon of dishwashing liquid.
  2. Dip a sponge into the bowl and wring out well. Then begin applying the solution directly onto the dye stain. You should see immediate lifting of the stain, but continue blotting until the stain has lifted completely.
  3. Follow with blotting the area with clear water, then blotting dry with a clean white towel or paper towels.

Peroxide and Dish Detergent Solution Method

  1. Pour two cups of warm water into a bowl. Stir in half of a cup of 3% hydrogen peroxide and a tablespoon of dishwashing liquid.
  2. Dip a sponge into the bowl and wring out well. Then begin applying the solution directly onto the dye stain. You should see immediate lifting of the stain, but continue blotting until the stain has lifted completely.
  3. Follow with blotting the area with clear water, then blotting dry with a clean white towel or paper towels.

OxiClean™ Carpet & Area Rug Stain Remover

  1. Spray enough of the product to saturate the dye stain.
  2. Allow the product to dwell for 10 minutes.
  3. Blot the area dry with a clean white towel or paper towels.
  4. Follow with blotting the area with clear water, then blotting dry with a clean white towel or paper towels.

Let your carpet and upholstery cleaning PRO help: On your next scheduled cleaning, show your technician the area. Any remaining stain residue can be treated and cleaned.


This article is one of a series of articles written and published on behalf of SurpHaces PRO Partners.

3 Tips for Comparing Stone Restoration Bids

Choosing a stone restoration contractor by comparing bids based only on price can be a costly mistake. There are other important factors to consider before you make a decision. Here are three tips for comparing stone restoration bids.

1. Does your contractor understand your particular type of stone?

Although there are similarities between marble, granite, travertine, and other types of stone, there are also differences that require specific restoration processes. Janitorial and cleaning companies may provide valuable services but their technicians are rarely properly trained, qualified, or experienced when it comes to natural stone restoration. Even some stone restoration companies may have little or no experience with your specific type of natural stone. Be sure to ask what your prospective contractor knows about your stone. They may offer the cheapest price, but in the wrong hands, your stone could end up with poor quality results or problems such as dimpled or wavy surfaces.

2. Are there hidden costs not included in the bid?

Basic stone restoration involves honing to remove surface damage and polishing to restore the finish of the stone. Your prospective contractor may not have included other procedures necessary to make your stone look brand new again in the bid. For example, does your stone have deep scratches, chips, or cracks? If the bid only includes honing and polishing, the contractor is not legally obligated to do special repair work. Does your stone need to be sealed? If so, check if sealer application is included in the bid.

3. Will the contractor be able to accommodate your schedule?

Scheduling is important for many people, but especially for business owners and property managers. In order to minimize disruption to the normal routines of employees, guests, and patrons, it’s important to know that your contractor can provide a plan of action that includes a start and finish date, and if necessary, work during the least busy hours or make special accommodations, such as keeping sections of flooring open for traffic while they work. Be sure to communicate your needs and confirm these details before accepting a bid.

Once you’ve taken the time to select contractors and gather bids for your stone restoration project, follow these tips to make an informed decision so that you will be happy with the entire experience, not just the price.


This article is one of a series of articles written and published on behalf of SurpHaces PRO Partners.